Vascular/Pigmentation Removal

Vascular/Pigmentation Removal

As many as 50 percent of British women may be affected by varicose and spider veins. Fortunately, a variety of treatments are available to eliminate the appearance of these abnormalities. Spider veins, which spread like a spider's web, are flat, red, blue or purple veins on the skin's surface. Those spider veins, which are small and located on the face or areas with thinner skin, could easily be treated by IPL or laser. Varicose veins are larger, distended or raised. When one-way valves in the veins fail, blood no longer flows efficiently, causing veins to become enlarged and congested with blood. Heredity, hormones and daily routines play a roll in determining whether or not the valves will fail, leading to abnormal veins. While both types are cosmetically unappealing, varicose veins can be painful as well. Cramping, burning, itching and swelling are all common symptoms associated with varicose veins. In rare cases, they can bleed. For severe cases, doctors can remove veins surgically or by using a catheter to deliver radio-frequency energy to collapse the vein. Both methods require anaesthetics and a long recovery.

What causes vein problems? The five key factors that contribute to such circulatory problems at mid-life and beyond are as follows:

  • Poor nutrition
  • Excessive weight (> 20% above normal body weight)
  • Sedentary lifestyle
  • Chronic constipation and straining with bowel movements
  • Prolonged standing (and even sitting)

How many treatments are required? 
Depend on the size and the area of the lesion you may need between 4-6 treatments to control the problem, then obviously considering the predisposing factors regular check ups should be done and further treatments performed if necessities.


Is it safe? 
Lower energy levels result in superior results and maximum safety. Most people experience no side effects at all, though a few exhibit some short-term local reddening of the surrounding skin. Treatments require no patient downtime. Published studies state that the risk of scarring is less than 1%.